Additional Resources and Assistance

CareASSIST is here to help you get the information and support you need. In addition to the program offerings, you may also find the following downloads and online resources helpful.

CareASSIST Downloads

CareASSIST Application Download

CareASSIST Application

The CareASSIST application covers all aspects of the program: Access and Reimbursement, Financial Assistance, and Resource Support. Follow the directions on the form to apply, or call 1-833-WE+CARE (1-833-930-2273) to get started.

CareASSIST Brochure Download

CareASSIST Brochure

The CareASSIST brochure contains an overview of the program and its offerings.

CareASSIST Copay Program Overview Brochure Download

CareASSIST Copay Program Overview Brochure

The CareASSIST Copay Program overview brochure describes the program and its requirements.

CareASSIST Resource Navigation Flashcard Download

CareASSIST Resource Navigation Flashcard

An overview of potential sources of prescription assistance.

Online Resources

Certain patients may require information or assistance beyond what CareASSIST may offer. Below are links to external organizations that may be able to help, or you can call 1-833-WE+CARE (1-833-930-2273) to learn about alternate coverage options.

Medicaid.gov

Learn about Medicaid in your state and if you may be eligible.

Medicare.gov

Learn about Medicare and prescription drug coverage, eligibility, and how to access the care you may need.

Patient Advocate Foundation

Find help for insurance and healthcare access problems.

Patient Access Network Foundation

Offers help and hope to people with chronic or life-threatening illnesses for whom cost limits access to breakthrough medical treatments.

International Myeloma Foundation

The first and largest myeloma-specific charity in the world. With more than 525,000 members in 140 countries, the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) serves patients with myeloma, family members, and the medical community. The IMF provides a wide range of programs in the areas of research, education, support, and advocacy.

Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

Because its only motivation is to find a cure, the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation is unencumbered in its ability to identify the barriers to progress, develop models to overcome them, and help evolve the industry through technologies that foster collaboration and leverage the collective power of the entire community.

The Myeloma Beacon

Independent, up-to-date news and information for the multiple myeloma community.

American Cancer Society

A nationwide, community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem.

Cancer Support Community

A global network offering quality cancer support to millions of people touched by cancer, available online and at community-based centers and hospitals.

National Comprehensive Cancer Network®

A not-for-profit alliance of 28 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education.

CancerCare

A leading national organization dedicated to providing free support services and financial assistance to anyone affected by cancer.

Myeloma Crowd

A united community for multiple myeloma patients, caregivers, medical professionals, and supporters.

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

The mission of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is: cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. The LLS exists to find cures and ensure access to treatments for blood cancer patients. The LLS is the voice for all blood cancer patients, and works to ensure access to treatment.

What is SARCLISA?

SARCLISA is a prescription medicine used in combination with:

  • The medicines pomalidomide and dexamethasone, to treat adults who have received at least 2 prior therapies including lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor to treat multiple myeloma.
  • The medicines carfilzomib and dexamethasone, to treat adults with multiple myeloma who have already received 1 to 3 lines of treatment and they did not work or are no longer working.

It is not known if SARCLISA is safe and effective in children.

Important Safety Information

Do not receive SARCLISA if you have a history of a severe allergic reaction to isatuximab-irfc or any of the ingredients in SARCLISA (see the list of ingredients in the full Prescribing Information).

Before receiving SARCLISA, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have heart problems, if your healthcare provider prescribes SARCLISA in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone for you.
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. SARCLISA may harm your unborn baby. You should not receive SARCLISA during pregnancy.
  • Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective method of birth control during treatment and for 5 months after your last dose of SARCLISA. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that you can use during this time.

    Tell your healthcare provider right away if you think you are pregnant or become pregnant during treatment with SARCLISA.

  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if SARCLISA passes into your breast milk. You should not breastfeed during treatment with SARCLISA.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you have ever taken a medicine for your heart.

How will I receive SARCLISA?

  • SARCLISA will be given to you by your healthcare provider by intravenous (IV) infusion into your vein.
  • SARCLISA is given in treatment cycles of 28 days (4 weeks), together with either the medicines pomalidomide and dexamethasone, or carfilzomib and dexamethasone.
  • – In cycle 1, SARCLISA is usually given weekly.

    – Starting in cycle 2, SARCLISA is usually given every 2 weeks.

  • If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment.
  • Your healthcare provider will give you medicines before each dose of SARCLISA to help reduce the risk of infusion reactions (make them less frequent and severe).

What are the possible side effects of SARCLISA?

SARCLISA may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Infusion reactions. Infusion reactions are common with SARCLISA and can sometimes be severe or life threatening.
  • Your healthcare provider will prescribe medicines before each infusion of SARCLISA to help decrease your risk for infusion reactions or to help make any infusion reaction less severe. You will be monitored for infusion reactions during each dose of SARCLISA.

    Your healthcare provider may slow down or stop your infusion, or completely stop treatment with SARCLISA if you have an infusion reaction.

    Get medical help right away if you develop any of the following symptoms of infusion reaction during or after an infusion of SARCLISA:

    shortness of breath, wheezing, or trouble breathing

    swelling of the face, mouth, throat, or tongue

    throat tightness

    palpitations

    dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting

    headache

    cough

    rash or itching

    nausea

    runny or stuffy nose

    chills

  • Decreased white blood cell counts. Decreased white blood cell counts are common with SARCLISA and certain white blood cells can be severely decreased. You may have an increased risk of getting certain infections, such as upper and lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections.
  • Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell counts during treatment with SARCLISA. Your healthcare provider may prescribe an antibiotic or antiviral medicine to help prevent infection, or a medicine to help increase your white blood cell counts during treatment with SARCLISA.

    Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any fever or symptoms of infection during treatment with SARCLISA.

  • Risk of new cancers. New cancers have happened in people during treatment with SARCLISA. Your healthcare provider will monitor you for new cancers during treatment with SARCLISA.
  • Change in blood tests. SARCLISA can affect the results of blood tests to match your blood type. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to match your blood type before you start treatment with SARCLISA. Tell all of your healthcare providers that you are being treated with SARCLISA before receiving blood transfusions.
  • Heart failure. Heart failure can happen during treatment with SARCLISA in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of the following symptoms:
  • trouble breathing

    cough

    swelling of your ankles, feet, or legs

The most common side effects of SARCLISA in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone include:

  • lung infection (pneumonia)
  • decreased red blood cell counts (anemia)
  • upper respiratory tract infection
  • decreased platelet counts (thrombocytopenia)
  • diarrhea

The most common side effects of SARCLISA in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone include:

  • upper respiratory tract infection
  • tiredness and weakness
  • high blood pressure
  • diarrhea
  • lung infection (pneumonia)
  • trouble breathing
  • trouble sleeping
  • bronchitis
  • cough
  • back pain
  • decreased red blood cells (anemia)
  • decreased platelet counts (thrombocytopenia)

These are not all the possible side effects of SARCLISA. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.